rooks and minerals

Just got home from Quebec. We’ve been looking at some of the Monteregian Hills — silica-undersaturated plutons formed as part of the Great Meteor hotspot track (except it turns out it’s a lot more complicated than that) jutting out through the Ordovician limestone you can see here in the St. Lawrence Lowlands below. This was taken with my phone around the time we got to the top of Mt. St. Gregoire, the smallest and simplest of the hills we looked at. I did bring a DSLR with me on the trip, but I don’t have the energy to go through all the photos right now. 
After three days of living in the car and eating sub sandwiches, Timmy’s coffee, hummus and apples for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, I’m pretty glad to be home. I’ve got two sample bags full of rocks (the carbonatites at Oka pretty much made the trip for me, along with a really interesting nepheline syenite/gabbro complex around Brome and a weird banded hornfels I found as we got closer to the contact of the intrusion) and a report to write, but it feels pretty good to bust out the steeltoes again. I’m getting the sense that with a bit of practice, I might actually get pretty competent in the field. Especially since it turns out I’m pretty good with drafting maps and I’ve got a good grip on the chemistry and mineralogy side of things. Before this weekend I was pretty sure I was actually just terrible at everything.
Some exciting stuff: one, I just got an email this weekend about a geology company that’s offering part-time work through the school year, and two, I may get the opportunity to do some independent research as soon as next semester (which is a whole lot better than all the geography and mineral engineering courses I was planning on taking to try and get APGO accreditation). Three - I might be helping a few guys from class make an optical mineralogy reference website to help out the first- and second-years (atlases already exist online, but we want to make it interactive and have them actually contribute to its growth).  Four — there’s a professional conference coming up this week where I might also stand a chance of getting employed. 
My best academic decisions have been made recklessly, abruptly, and usually on a cell phone in the middle of the night. It’s how I got into this whole thing, and it hasn’t proven to be a bad decision yet, so I’m rolling with it. Last night in Mont-Saint-Hilaire I dropped the crap I was taking for breadth requirements after a conversation with one of the faculty members along for the trip. According to him — and I agree with him — my best bet is to focus on everything that will make me a good, well-rounded, highly competent geologist in this field first and accreditation second, and I’m not going to be able to do that if I’m stuck in a course learning for the seven fucking millionth time what a podzol is or how ecological change is, you know, totally a thing and stuff.  And I’m especially not going to be able to do it working a crappy retail job, or wasting my time, or half-assing my way through projects and avoiding responsibility. 
So far this semester’s been great for me. Time to make the next few fantastic. 

Just got home from Quebec. We’ve been looking at some of the Monteregian Hills — silica-undersaturated plutons formed as part of the Great Meteor hotspot track (except it turns out it’s a lot more complicated than that) jutting out through the Ordovician limestone you can see here in the St. Lawrence Lowlands below. This was taken with my phone around the time we got to the top of Mt. St. Gregoire, the smallest and simplest of the hills we looked at. I did bring a DSLR with me on the trip, but I don’t have the energy to go through all the photos right now. 

After three days of living in the car and eating sub sandwiches, Timmy’s coffee, hummus and apples for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, I’m pretty glad to be home. I’ve got two sample bags full of rocks (the carbonatites at Oka pretty much made the trip for me, along with a really interesting nepheline syenite/gabbro complex around Brome and a weird banded hornfels I found as we got closer to the contact of the intrusion) and a report to write, but it feels pretty good to bust out the steeltoes again. I’m getting the sense that with a bit of practice, I might actually get pretty competent in the field. Especially since it turns out I’m pretty good with drafting maps and I’ve got a good grip on the chemistry and mineralogy side of things. Before this weekend I was pretty sure I was actually just terrible at everything.

Some exciting stuff: one, I just got an email this weekend about a geology company that’s offering part-time work through the school year, and two, I may get the opportunity to do some independent research as soon as next semester (which is a whole lot better than all the geography and mineral engineering courses I was planning on taking to try and get APGO accreditation). Three - I might be helping a few guys from class make an optical mineralogy reference website to help out the first- and second-years (atlases already exist online, but we want to make it interactive and have them actually contribute to its growth).  Four — there’s a professional conference coming up this week where I might also stand a chance of getting employed. 

My best academic decisions have been made recklessly, abruptly, and usually on a cell phone in the middle of the night. It’s how I got into this whole thing, and it hasn’t proven to be a bad decision yet, so I’m rolling with it. Last night in Mont-Saint-Hilaire I dropped the crap I was taking for breadth requirements after a conversation with one of the faculty members along for the trip. According to him — and I agree with him — my best bet is to focus on everything that will make me a good, well-rounded, highly competent geologist in this field first and accreditation second, and I’m not going to be able to do that if I’m stuck in a course learning for the seven fucking millionth time what a podzol is or how ecological change is, you know, totally a thing and stuff.  And I’m especially not going to be able to do it working a crappy retail job, or wasting my time, or half-assing my way through projects and avoiding responsibility. 

So far this semester’s been great for me. Time to make the next few fantastic. 

Above is a song that makes BTN push presses not suck. Therefore, it is a good song.

Things I did today:

- unfucked my snatch a bit more. My pulling strength is absurdly disproportionate to how much I actually snatch, so it’s nice to see that number go up from abysmal to slightly more acceptable. Things unfucked: changing my grip (like everything I do, it’s TOO DAMN WIDE. Bringing it in helped), changing my foot position ( narrow, heels close to wide and splayed out like an asshole), trying to fix my donkey-kicking problem. I just want to clean and jerk and squat forever; is that really so wrong?

- squatted 95kgx5 and was told I’ve easily got a 115-120kg single in me; followed that up by 95kgx4, 95kgx3, and 80kgx8. Good feels. This is the last time I’ll have a belt for a while, so I’m really not sure what to do with myself now. ALAS.

- shared my platform with snide assholes who couldn’t count plates

- BTN push presses should only be done with a bar with no center knurling (ie the women’s bar) unless you really enjoy scraping all the skin off the back of your neck in one fell swoop

- cutting blows but what else do you do when you’re too poor to buy food GOODBYE GAINS

T-Nation: Pairing Strength With Mobility